Rollicking, Solemn, Risky, Sexy–The Long Poem

þ

Interested in spending

years

working on a poem?

After dealing with the likes of Gilgamesh, Ampersand Press is aware of 1) just how much work writing poetry is and 2) just how much *more* work is involved in the long poem (here defined as any narrative poem over 100 lines).

That is probably the reason why we see so little of the modern long poem out on the bookshelves. And yet most of the traditional devices of prosody evolved precisely to help poets telling an extended story. No wonder the turn to shorter forms has been accompanied by an exodus from the burdens of meter, rhyme, and stanza. (Not to mention the risky act of plotting.)

Yet some of the most satisfying poetry has emerged from the longer form–Homer, Shakespeare, The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, and The Highwayman offer an idea of the range of effect that can be achieved in traditional poetic lengths.

So AP will be keeping our eyes peeled for appearances of the longer poem–especially when it begins accepting submissions next year. How about the epic of your home town? Any idea what line 1,252 says?

AP

Drawing: Lucius Encounters the Murderous Wife, illustration from The Golden Ass; author: Jean de Bosschere; WikiCmns; Public Domain.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Rollicking, Solemn, Risky, Sexy–The Long Poem

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s